February 22, 2024

Volhard’s method in Precipitation titrations

Volhard’s method in Precipitation titrations

Volhard’s method is a precipitation titration technique used to determine the concentration of halide ions (Cl-, Br-, I-) in a solution. The method is based on the reaction between the halide ions and a silver ion solution, which produces a precipitate of silver halide.

To carry out the Volhard method, a known volume of the solution containing the halide ions is first treated with an excess of standard silver nitrate solution to precipitate all of the halide ions. Any excess silver ions in the solution are then titrated with a standardized solution of thiocyanate ions (SCN-).

The reaction between the silver ions and thiocyanate ions produces a complex ion, silver thiocyanate (AgSCN), which is soluble in water and has a red color. The endpoint of the titration is reached when all of the silver ions have reacted with the thiocyanate ions, forming a red color that persists for 30 seconds or more.

The amount of thiocyanate added to reach the endpoint can be used to calculate the amount of silver ions that reacted with the halide ions. This information can then be used to determine the concentration of the halide ions in the original solution, using stoichiometry of the reaction.

The Volhard method is a sensitive and accurate method for determining the concentration of halide ions in a solution, and is commonly used in analytical chemistry and in the pharmaceutical industry. However, the method is prone to interference from other ions that can form insoluble precipitates with silver ions, such as sulfide and phosphate ions. Therefore, care must be taken to ensure that interfering ions are not present in the sample being analyzed.

Modified Volhard’s method

In the modified Volhard method, the sample is first treated with excess standard solution of silver nitrate to precipitate all the halide ions as silver halide. The excess silver ions are then titrated with a standard solution of ammonium thiocyanate using iron (III) as an indicator. The iron (III) ion reacts with the thiocyanate ion to form a deep red colored complex, which is the endpoint of the titration.

The advantage of this modification is that the endpoint is more distinct and easier to detect than in the traditional Volhard method, where the endpoint is determined by observing the disappearance of white precipitate of silver halide.

To carry out the modified Volhard method, a known quantity of the sample is first acidified with nitric acid to remove any interfering substances. The acidified sample is then treated with an excess of silver nitrate solution to precipitate the halide ions as silver halide.

After filtering the precipitate, the excess silver ions in the filtrate are titrated with the standard ammonium thiocyanate solution using iron (III) ion as an indicator. The endpoint is reached when the red color of the iron (III) thiocyanate complex persists for a few seconds.

The amount of halide ions present in the sample can be calculated from the amount of standard silver nitrate solution used to precipitate the halides and the amount of standard ammonium thiocyanate solution used to titrate the excess silver ions.

The modified Volhard method is a useful modification of the traditional Volhard method and can provide more accurate and precise results for the determination of halides in a sample.

Frequently asked questions

What is Volhard’s method in precipitation titrations?

Volhard’s method is a precipitation titration technique used to determine the concentration of a known analyte by reacting it with a standardized solution of a precipitating agent. In this method, a known excess of the precipitating agent is added to the analyte solution, forming a precipitate. The excess precipitating agent is then back-titrated with a standardized solution of another reagent to determine the amount of unreacted precipitating agent, which is used to calculate the concentration of the analyte.

Which precipitating agent is commonly used in Volhard’s method?

Silver nitrate (AgNO3) is the most commonly used precipitating agent in Volhard’s method. It forms a white precipitate of silver chloride (AgCl) when reacted with chloride ions in the analyte solution.

What is the principle behind Volhard’s method?

The principle behind Volhard’s method is the reaction between the analyte containing chloride ions and an excess of silver nitrate, resulting in the formation of a white precipitate of silver chloride. The excess silver ions that do not react with chloride ions in the analyte solution are then titrated with a standardized solution of another reagent, typically potassium thiocyanate (KSCN), to form a reddish-brown complex of silver thiocyanate (AgSCN). The endpoint of the titration is indicated by the formation of a persistent reddish-brown color, indicating the completion of the reaction and the determination of the analyte concentration.

Can Volhard’s method be automated?

Yes, Volhard’s method can be automated using an automatic titrator. This allows for more precise and efficient titrations by controlling the addition of reagents and accurately determining the endpoint. Automation also reduces human error and increases the reproducibility of results.

First Year B Pharm Notes, Syllabus, Books, PDF Subjectwise/Topicwise

F Y B Pharm Sem-IF Y B Pharm Sem-II
BP101T Human Anatomy and Physiology I TheoryBP201T Human Anatomy and Physiology II – Theory
BP102T Pharmaceutical Analysis I TheoryBP202T Pharmaceutical Organic Chemistry I Theory
BP103T Pharmaceutics I TheoryBP203T Biochemistry – Theory
BP104T Pharmaceutical Inorganic Chemistry TheoryBP204T Pathophysiology – Theory
BP105T Communication skills TheoryBP205T Computer Applications in Pharmacy Theory
BP106RBT Remedial BiologyBP206T Environmental sciences – Theory
BP106RMT Remedial Mathematics TheoryBP207P Human Anatomy and Physiology II Practical
BP107P Human Anatomy and Physiology PracticalBP208P Pharmaceutical Organic Chemistry I Practical
BP108P Pharmaceutical Analysis I PracticalBP209P Biochemistry Practical
BP109P Pharmaceutics I PracticalBP210P Computer Applications in Pharmacy Practical
BP110P Pharmaceutical Inorganic Chemistry Practical
BP111P Communication skills Practical
BP112RBP Remedial Biology Practical

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