May 30, 2024

Therapeutic incompatibilities with examples

Therapeutic incompatibilities with examples

Therapeutic incompatibilities in pharmaceuticals occur when two or more drugs are administered together, leading to an adverse effect on the therapeutic efficacy of one or more of the drugs. The following are examples of therapeutic incompatibilities:

  1. Antagonistic drug interactions: Antagonistic drug interactions occur when two drugs have opposite effects, resulting in a reduced therapeutic effect. For example, the combination of a diuretic and an antihypertensive drug can lead to a reduction in the antihypertensive effect.
  2. Additive drug interactions: Additive drug interactions occur when two drugs have a similar effect, resulting in an increased risk of toxicity. For example, the combination of two nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can increase the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding.
  3. Potentiative drug interactions: Potentiative drug interactions occur when two drugs have a synergistic effect, resulting in an increased therapeutic effect. For example, the combination of an opioid pain reliever and a non-opioid pain reliever can lead to an enhanced analgesic effect.
  4. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions: Pharmacokinetic drug interactions occur when one drug affects the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or excretion of another drug, resulting in changes in its therapeutic effect. For example, the combination of a drug that inhibits cytochrome P450 enzymes with another drug that is metabolized by these enzymes can lead to an increased risk of toxicity.
  5. Toxic drug interactions: Toxic drug interactions occur when two drugs interact to produce a toxic effect. For example, the combination of an antidepressant and a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) can lead to serotonin syndrome, a potentially life-threatening condition.

It is important for healthcare professionals to be aware of potential therapeutic incompatibilities when prescribing or administering medications. They must assess the patient’s medical history, current medications, and other factors that may affect drug interactions to minimize the risk of adverse effects.

First Year B Pharm Notes, Syllabus, Books, PDF Subjectwise/Topicwise

F Y B Pharm Sem-IS Y B Pharm Sem-II
BP101T Human Anatomy and Physiology I TheoryBP201T Human Anatomy and Physiology II – Theory
BP102T Pharmaceutical Analysis I TheoryBP202T Pharmaceutical Organic Chemistry I Theory
BP103T Pharmaceutics I TheoryBP203T Biochemistry – Theory
BP104T Pharmaceutical Inorganic Chemistry TheoryBP204T Pathophysiology – Theory
BP105T Communication skills TheoryBP205T Computer Applications in Pharmacy Theory
BP106RBT Remedial BiologyBP206T Environmental sciences – Theory
BP106RMT Remedial Mathematics TheoryBP207P Human Anatomy and Physiology II Practical
BP107P Human Anatomy and Physiology PracticalBP208P Pharmaceutical Organic Chemistry I Practical
BP108P Pharmaceutical Analysis I PracticalBP209P Biochemistry Practical
BP109P Pharmaceutics I PracticalBP210P Computer Applications in Pharmacy Practical
BP110P Pharmaceutical Inorganic Chemistry Practical
BP111P Communication skills Practical
BP112RBP Remedial Biology Practical

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