February 23, 2024

Conductometric titrations

Conductometric titrations

Conductometric titrations are a type of titration in which the electrical conductivity of a solution is measured during the titration process. This technique is used to determine the equivalence point of a titration, which is the point at which the amount of titrant added is stoichiometrically equivalent to the amount of analyte in the solution.

In conductometric titrations, an electrode is placed in the solution being titrated, and another electrode is placed in the titrant solution. As the titrant is added, the electrical conductivity of the solution changes, and this change is measured by the electrodes. At the equivalence point, there is a sudden change in conductivity, which indicates that all of the analyte has reacted with the titrant.

Conductometric titrations are commonly used in the analysis of inorganic compounds, particularly for acid-base and redox titrations. This technique has several advantages over other titration methods, including high accuracy, precision, and sensitivity, as well as the ability to detect weak acids and bases. However, conductometric titrations also have some limitations, such as the requirement for a conductive titrant and the need for careful control of temperature and other factors that can affect conductivity.

Types of Conductometric titrations

Conductometric titrations are a type of titration that measures the change in electrical conductivity of a solution as a function of the amount of a titrant added. The most common types of conductometric titrations include:

  1. Acid-base titration: This involves the titration of an acid with a base or vice versa. The change in conductivity is due to the presence or absence of H+ or OH- ions in the solution.
  2. Redox titration: This involves the titration of a reducing agent with an oxidizing agent or vice versa. The change in conductivity is due to the transfer of electrons between the two species.
  3. Precipitation titration: This involves the titration of a precipitating agent with a solution containing the analyte. The change in conductivity is due to the formation of a precipitate and the removal of ions from the solution.
  4. Complexometric titration: This involves the titration of a metal ion with a complexing agent. The change in conductivity is due to the formation or disappearance of the complex ion.
  5. Non-aqueous titration: This involves the titration of a non-aqueous solvent with a titrant. The change in conductivity is due to the presence or absence of ions in the solvent.

Overall, conductometric titrations are a versatile tool for quantitative analysis and can be applied to a wide range of chemical reactions.

First Year B Pharm Notes, Syllabus, Books, PDF Subjectwise/Topicwise

F Y B Pharm Sem-IF Y B Pharm Sem-II
BP101T Human Anatomy and Physiology I TheoryBP201T Human Anatomy and Physiology II – Theory
BP102T Pharmaceutical Analysis I TheoryBP202T Pharmaceutical Organic Chemistry I Theory
BP103T Pharmaceutics I TheoryBP203T Biochemistry – Theory
BP104T Pharmaceutical Inorganic Chemistry TheoryBP204T Pathophysiology – Theory
BP105T Communication skills TheoryBP205T Computer Applications in Pharmacy Theory
BP106RBT Remedial BiologyBP206T Environmental sciences – Theory
BP106RMT Remedial Mathematics TheoryBP207P Human Anatomy and Physiology II Practical
BP107P Human Anatomy and Physiology PracticalBP208P Pharmaceutical Organic Chemistry I Practical
BP108P Pharmaceutical Analysis I PracticalBP209P Biochemistry Practical
BP109P Pharmaceutics I PracticalBP210P Computer Applications in Pharmacy Practical
BP110P Pharmaceutical Inorganic Chemistry Practical
BP111P Communication skills Practical
BP112RBP Remedial Biology Practical

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