February 22, 2024

Classification of acid-base titrations

Classification of acid-base titrations

Acid-base titrations are a type of chemical analysis used to determine the concentration of an acid or a base in a solution by reacting it with a solution of known concentration. There are several types of acid-base titrations, which can be classified based on the nature of the acid and base involved, the method of endpoint detection, and the type of reaction that occurs during the titration. Here are some common classifications of acid-base titrations:

  1. Strong acid-Strong base titration: This type of titration involves the neutralization of a strong acid with a strong base, such as the reaction between hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide. The pH of the solution changes rapidly near the equivalence point.
  2. Weak acid-Strong base titration: This type of titration involves the neutralization of a weak acid with a strong base, such as the reaction between acetic acid and sodium hydroxide. The pH of the solution changes more gradually near the equivalence point.
  3. Strong acid-Weak base titration: This type of titration involves the neutralization of a strong acid with a weak base, such as the reaction between hydrochloric acid and ammonia. The pH of the solution changes more gradually near the equivalence point than in a strong acid-strong base titration.
  4. Acid-base titration with a diprotic acid or a polyprotic acid: This type of titration involves the neutralization of an acid that can donate multiple protons, such as sulfuric acid or phosphoric acid. The pH curve may show multiple equivalence points.
  5. Acid-base titration with a mixture of acids: This type of titration involves the neutralization of a mixture of acids, such as a mixture of a weak acid and a strong acid. The pH curve may show multiple inflection points.
  6. Acid-base titration with a weak base: This type of titration involves the neutralization of a weak base with a strong acid, such as the reaction between ammonia and hydrochloric acid. The pH of the solution changes more gradually near the equivalence point.
  7. Acid-base titration with a nonaqueous solvent: This type of titration involves the use of a nonaqueous solvent, such as ethanol or acetic acid, instead of water as the solvent. The pH curve may be different from that of an aqueous titration.

The choice of titration method depends on the properties of the acid and base being titrated and the desired accuracy and precision of the analysis.

First Year B Pharm Notes, Syllabus, Books, PDF Subjectwise/Topicwise

F Y B Pharm Sem-IF Y B Pharm Sem-II
BP101T Human Anatomy and Physiology I TheoryBP201T Human Anatomy and Physiology II – Theory
BP102T Pharmaceutical Analysis I TheoryBP202T Pharmaceutical Organic Chemistry I Theory
BP103T Pharmaceutics I TheoryBP203T Biochemistry – Theory
BP104T Pharmaceutical Inorganic Chemistry TheoryBP204T Pathophysiology – Theory
BP105T Communication skills TheoryBP205T Computer Applications in Pharmacy Theory
BP106RBT Remedial BiologyBP206T Environmental sciences – Theory
BP106RMT Remedial Mathematics TheoryBP207P Human Anatomy and Physiology II Practical
BP107P Human Anatomy and Physiology PracticalBP208P Pharmaceutical Organic Chemistry I Practical
BP108P Pharmaceutical Analysis I PracticalBP209P Biochemistry Practical
BP109P Pharmaceutics I PracticalBP210P Computer Applications in Pharmacy Practical
BP110P Pharmaceutical Inorganic Chemistry Practical
BP111P Communication skills Practical
BP112RBP Remedial Biology Practical

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